Category: Mindset

Big Changes Ahead for Healthcare: Be the Provider not the Patient

 

Speaking to audiences on managing change in the healthcare industry, I often compare hospitals and clinics that are content with clinging to an outmoded mindset to patients awaiting miracles rather than getting legitimate medical help.

No matter your place in the healthcare system, change is either at your doorstep, or it’s coming at you from all directions. The changes are not coming quietly, and will demand a new vision.

Dr. Stephen Klasco, interviewed for Modern Healthcare (May 2019), said:

“We’re going through a once-in-a-lifetime change in healthcare from a B-to-B [Business to Business] model to a B-to-C model [Business to Consumer]; the physician and administrator as the boss to the patient is the boss. If you believe that … you have to fundamentally change how you view things.”

The medical facility and its providers must have the determination to manage the changes sweeping over the industry.

Managing Healthcare Change from All Directions

About a year ago, healthcare writer A.J. Abrawal identified at least six factors that are bringing about change in the industry:  technological advancements, a shift to practices that are more for-profit than non-profit, the changing landscape of the Affordable Care Act, the widespread use of patient data, the modernization of payment options, and more readily available healthcare advice.

Taking any of the changes identified and combining them with Dr. Klasco’s comment, it is easy to envision a scenario where healthcare is soon to become increasingly closer to a supermarket concept of picking and choosing options from a shelf. In fact, it’s about to become literal. For example, the October 4, 2019 issue of Supermarket News states:

“Next month, Sam’s Club plans to begin testing a program that offers members bundles of health care services — including medical, pharmacy, dental and vision care — for a low annual fee. [It is] Called Sam’s Club Care Accelerator Together with Humana.”

It is a given if the Sam’s Club model becomes successful, other national supermarket and wholesale stores will follow. By bundling services, consumers are manifesting a desire to implement a set of changes that the healthcare industry should have seen evolving quite some time ago.

In a 2018 survey sponsored by Aetna, it was seen that patients clearly want greater choice in their care. They want a more holistic approach of diet and exercise rather than relying on a practice for all of their care. Patients are more educated about their desires and treatment than ever before. The study summarized, in part, the findings in this manner:

“It’s clear that in the changing health care environment, transforming care delivery means considering care of the whole person. New care models such as value-based care, in which doctors are rewarded for improving patient outcomes, are creating opportunities to do just that…”

In this shift patients are wanting more choice and asking more questions. They are literally shopping for the best combination of services for their needs, and overall, they are demanding much greater transparency in how they are treated and billed. The industry will have no choice but to change to meet these needs in the years to come.

Book Scott Burrows, Motivational Healthcare Industry Change Management Speaker for your next healthcare industry meeting through this website or by calling us at: (520) 548-1169

 

Comfortable Sales Goals Lead to Sleeping at Your Desk

 

Not long ago, I was leading a seminar on real estate sales and setting sales goals when a new agent asked if I thought daily prospecting and follow-up did much good. She clarified she prospected when she had a chance, but she was more interested collecting referrals. She shrugged when I questioned how she defined goals for collecting referrals. Then I asked if she felt she had the grit be successful. The word “grit” stopped her cold.

What are Your Goals for Real Estate Sales Success?

Depending on the source, the failure rate for real estate agents after one year has been estimated at between 75 and 87 percent. Most of the agents who do make it barely squeak by. The old rule of thumb said that about 80 percent of the brokers make 20 percent of the profits. The new norm is even more intimidating. According to industry experts, it has now become the 90/10 Rule where 90 percent of the realtors earn 10 percent of the commissions and ultimately, just the top 1 percent of the realtors earn 40 percent of the commissions!

Mike Lalji, a highly successful real estate broker for the past 35 years, described some key elements that characterize a “1 percenter.”

“Those 1% Realtors…pretty much make whatever their written goal is for the new year. They write their goals a day or 2 before the 1st of January of the new year… they develop good interpersonal relationships with family and friends and are self-motivated.”

The Close.com website in a January 2019 article entitled “Why So Many Realtors Fail After 2 Years (and How Not To)” listed a failure to set goals as one of the key reasons new real estate agents fail to make the cut.

The article cited a sophisticated scientific paper printed in 2015 in Nature magazine. Simply put, the article stated that written goal setting and the determination to follow it through erases all differences between gender, ethnicity, race and other factors.  No matter where new agents start out, if they write down their goals and have the grit to follow it through, they have an infinitely better chance of succeeding.

The Joy of Prospecting

Alexis Petersen writing in January 2019 for RIS Media, an online real estate magazine, stated several goals in order for agents to be successful and listed the following as being important:  setting realistic prospecting goals, committing to prospecting ideas – including cold calls and visits as well as referrals, focusing on quantity prospecting (not just to friends and family), following up on every call, email, text or inquiry, and my favorite, “Make prospecting part of your daily routine.”

Petersen echoed other articles written by industry professionals. It is having the determination to write down and set goals, the grit to prospect every day, to follow up on every lead, and to network whenever possible. As a real estate sales professional, you must have the vision to separate yourself from the pack and be part of the 1 percent who believe they will succeed.

Don’t get comfortable and wait for the market to come to your feet. It won’t. Have the courage to stand up and be a professional real estate agent, fighting each day for your success.

Book Scott Burrows, Inspirational Real Estate Keynote Speaker on Sales and Goal Setting, through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

What Does It Mean to Be a Resilient Sales Team?

          When I speak to sales teams about resiliency, it’s not difficult to feel passionate about it. As the result of an accident that landed me in a wheelchair and quickly ended a successful sports career, I had to develop the mindset to climb back into the ring of life. I was forced to push through painful and often overwhelming physical circumstances with focus and resiliency, while at the same time reinvent my life and adjust my mindset to a new career in sales as an insurance and financial advisor.

You are more than words

Dr. Alia J. Crum is one of the world’s leading authorities on stress. In 2013, she co-wrote a brilliant article entitled “Rethinking Stress: The Role of Mindsets in Determining the Stress Response.” Her article focused on stress and negativity. To quote from her findings:

“Stress is [often] portrayed in a negative light…the intention of these depictions is to help prevent or stem the negative effects of stress: however, if the self-fulfilling nature of mindset exists, the result of such prophesy may be counter effective. Repetitive portrayals of stress in a negative light not increases the possibility that we form the mindset that stress-is-debilitating…”

This finding is important for sales teams who are facing challenges. What Dr. Crum is saying is that if a sales team wills itself to say, “We’re under so much stress to produce, we don’t know what to do. We might as well give up.” The team will come to believe that it can’t overcome the adversity it is facing; the team will lose its resiliency to find new solutions. It will, in fact, will itself to become crippled.

The American Psychological Association in its paper, “The Road to Resilience” gives 11 keys to overcoming major challenges. Among the more important keys to avoid seeing a crisis as an insurmountable problem is to develop resiliency, to accept that change is a part of living, to always be moving toward goals, and to not be afraid to take decisive action.

Your sales team may be confronted with major competitors, a shift in the economy, new technologies or even a shakeup in your organization. It doesn’t mean there aren’t solutions.

Resiliency is about finding a new way to take action. Your vision and mindset, combined with the determination to overcome the adversity of what is in front of the team will make you successful.

The sales professional website, Salesforce.com, sees resilience as the way to overcome negative messages. In order to overcome adversity, they advise that sales teams should build trust, build accountability, build commitment, and that you should build your team and most importantly work on building yourself.

I rose out of my bed because I trusted those around me, I made myself accountable for what I could do, I made a commitment to myself and to my therapists, I resolved to be a strong member of my sales team and I never let my mindset settle for anything less than my best. Sales people and sales teams can become more resilient.

Is your sales team ready to accept the task of becoming more resilient to the challenges you are facing? The best sales teams are the most resilient. Taking the first step may not be easy, but taking the first step never fails to lead to the next.

 

Contact Scott Burrows, World-Class Inspirational Speaker on Creating Resilient Sales Teams through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

The Toll of the Takeover: Change Your Mindset

 

In delivering my motivational addresses on Change Management, I am often asked about the toll that mergers and takeovers have on the employees of the organization.

I view mergers and takeovers as paralleling the experiences I encountered after my two accidents. I went from being a competitive martial artist and Division I football player to a quadriplegic; from physically in-control of myself to fighting for my life in a hospital bed. During my extensive rehab, I had to find a new mindset. It led me to inspiring employees undergoing change in their organizations to overcoming the hardship they face in losing the familiar and the predictable.

The Fear is Real

In his 1987 book, The Employee Guide to Mergers and Acquisitions, Dr. Price Pritchett identified the fears of employees when they realize their companies are about to undergo takeovers. The fears include: uncertainty, ambiguity, mistrust, and self-preservation. During the takeover period employees are on-edge; they tend to not believe anything related to them by managements; and many keep low profiles, preferring to stay hidden and stay behind the scenes. I realized these behaviors were very similar to the patient who blames the world for their troubles, does not follow doctor’s orders for strength and conditioning, and essentially gives up.

There are much better ways to change the negative mindset when a merger or takeover is about to unfold. In January 2019, The Journal of Urgent Care Medicine presented a paper entitled, “Dealing with the Emotional Impact of a Merger or Acquisition.” Not surprising, three emotions set in throughout the organization: shock and numbness, suffering (as the full impact sets in), and what is called “resolution,” or as I like to call it, the “what are you going to do about it?” stage. After my initial diagnosis, I was first in shock, then I realized what the outcome could be and finally, what could I do to change my mindset?

While the fear is real, the ultimate outcome is up to every employee of the organization to either see themselves as “sick” or to overcome the adversity of change and accept that the best change agent is you. In accepting the fact that the takeover or merger is happening, there is the choice to blame anyone and everything on the takeover or to accept the situation and handle it as you would any growth experience.

It Comes Down to Positive Mindset

The organization Total Wellness Health outlined mindset-changing attitudes whether your organization is undergoing a takeover or merger or other sweeping changes. Among the most important coping skills to help employees manage change are using positive messaging – be optimistic about the future; develop positive relationships, especially with your new co-workers; be upbeat, even if others wallow in negativity; and always communicate with others in a positive way.

In managing change we each have a choice. Many years ago, while lying in a hospital bed, I was determined to have an optimistic vision of wellness and I worked hard toward that goal. A positive mindset is contagious and affects everyone around you. The best way to manage change is to be a positive change agent.

Contact Scott Burrows, Change Management Mergers/Takeover Motivational Speaker, through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

Tough Times for Pharma Sales Reps. What is Your Mindset?

As a pharmaceutical sales keynote speaker, I know these are not easy times to be a pharmaceutical sales rep. The once glamorous profession is facing greater stresses and more adversity than ever before.

The statistics bear me out. According to ZS Associates, the U.S.-based management consulting firm specializing in the pharmaceutical industry, the industry will have around 60,000 reps this year, down from a sales force of about 100,000 reps in 2005.  In addition to the decline in reps, there is a more troubling trend. In 2012 about 65% of physicians were “accessible” to meet with a sales rep but by 2016 the percentage had dropped to barely 44%.

What is going on?

Some industry old-timers might point to the Sun Shine Act of 2007, which started the process of greater transparency, less gift-giving and “bonuses” but that is hardly responsible for present day problems. Market research into attitudes of physicians toward pharmaceutical sales reps confirms what many of you are feeling:  the relationship has soured.

In 2017, the healthcare market research firm DRG Digital – Manhattan Research published physician polling data that should be a wake-up call to the industry.

Overcoming the Perception of Being Stale

The research found that more than half of the physicians felt reps showed them information they had seen before. To the practices, most visits were time wasters. Some specialties placed the “staleness problem” even higher. Seven out of ten oncologists and six out of ten dermatologists had a good idea of what reps would present about their drug before the reps ever called on the physicians.

The research also revealed 75% of physicians routinely found what they needed about the drug online and more than half regularly used pharmaceutical digital databases. Unless there was something new to for a rep to offer, the feeling was why bother?

Despite the disappointment of being presented with old information, about 65% of the doctors polled met with their sales reps and six out of ten said they wanted to meet with their pharmaceutical sales reps in the future. They remained optimistic something new might be offered.

Though the use of computer tablets by the reps dramatically dropped between 2013 to 2017, it didn’t mean that tablet presentations were obsolete. Far more important was new information on what organizations offered patients in terms of education and support.

Overcoming the Communication Gap

Though many of the reps use dedicated health industry software communications platforms, only 12 percent of the physicians polled said they communicated with their reps in that fashion. At the same time, three times as many physicians said they had thought about communicating that way. There is a communication gap.

DRG Digital – Manhattan Research concluded in part that “Sales and marketing teams need to provide a deeper level of support to physicians beyond product promotion and maximizing their investment.”

It comes down to support, education and a commitment to customer service, not just leaving samples and hoping for a prescription quota. In addition, the landscape has shifted to being more adversarial and less welcoming than ever before. Medical and pharmacy students are being taught “resistance techniques” to cope with pressure from sales reps and patients from their earliest days of classwork.

The pharmaceutical sales landscape may be tense with difficulty, but it can be overcome. Physicians want information they can’t get from anyone but you, along with extra-effort support and communication. Will you have the mindset to deliver on their needs and to overcome the adversity of negative perceptions?

 

For more information on how Pharmaceutical sales representatives can develop techniques to rise above the crowd, contact Scott Burrows, pharmaceutical sales keynote speaker today through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169