Blog

Are You Determined to Change When There is No Choice?

Business change and personal development are subjects that deeply resonate with me. When I speak to associations and corporations undergoing business change, I understand how tough it can be.

When organizations change in response to a new reporting structure, acquisitions, mergers or implementing new software or accounting systems, it isn’t the business change that bothers most employees but fears over how it will affect their job, status and comfort zones. Before speaking to groups about organizational change, I’ve overheard, “I’m not going change for them, I want my freedom.”

Change comes to all of us, and most of us are powerless when it happens. Before quadriplegia, I was a Division I football player and a martial artist. After my injury I had no choice but to transform myself in response to my injuries. I was determined to take responsibility for my circumstance.

Sigmund Freud

It was the great Dr. Freud who hit the nail of business change right on the head:

“Most people do not really want freedom, because freedom involves responsibility, and most people are frightened by responsibility.”

We can sit in our offices (or hospital beds) and fume or we can realize that no one is responsible for our success but ourselves. Whatever issues that led to the changes in your organization are over. What remains is whether you have the determination to embrace the business change and adjust your vision to be successful.

Psychology Today magazine, in their article “4 Steps to Stop Blaming,” advises us to have the intention to stop blaming, to make a determined effort to become more mindful of blaming, and most important if you can’t blame someone or something in this case for the business change, what would you need to feel? In other words, what is your vision for how you’re going to handle the change?

If your business has been acquired, or if a portion of the business has been outsourced, or if a new product line has been brought into your department, what is your plan for success and how will you develop the tenacity to overcome the challenges?

Business Change Can Be a Good Thing

To those determined to change when there is no choice, change can be positive and transforming. Inc. magazine wrote about how employees who embrace business change can transform companies. Their piece “Why Change Is Essential to Your Organization (And How to Embrace It)” stated:

“The most successful companies are built on a desire to bring forth positive changes in the world. This kind of mission attracts smart, autonomous, creative people who can help you [the CEO] solve tough challenges in an innovative way. On top of that, it requires leaders who are catalysts for change throughout the organization.”

You can be a be a positive force for change in your organization with the determination to overcome the adversity of business change.

My mission to be the best possible business change keynote speaker has been strengthened by my own journey. In having no choice but to change, I have developed the vision to help others make positive changes for their organizations.

To book Scott Burrows, Business Change Inspirational Keynote and Breakout Speaker contact Scott through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

Why is Building a Great Team So Difficult?

 

In delivering keynote addresses and workshops across the country on teamwork and what it takes to build a great team, the common refrain is always, “Scott, why is it so darn difficult?” It is, and I might add it’s not your imagination.

Bill Green, writing for inc. magazine (March 20, 2018) noted: “The only way to build a winning team is to recruit and train people you believe can manage different parts of the ship without needing you to handhold them through every decision. This means thinking hard about how you can teach them to make their own decisions.”

Building a great team often requires the leader, the manager, or chief executive to lose ego and have the vision to allow her people to succeed or fail on their own merits.

The next question I usually encounter is, “Scott, suppose the team becomes so effective they no longer need the manager?”

That’s the point, isn’t it? How can a team develop the determination to rise above the task ahead of them if the leader always sticks in his two cents to auto-correct even the most minor detail? Assuming the manager has hired good people, why not have the faith that they will develop the grit to accomplish the task they’ve been given?

Know Your Strengths and Weaknesses

Building a great team does not mean, of course, that there is no communication between the manager and the team. In fact, it is the opposite. There must be constant communication. The leader must have the determination to never let the team down in terms of supplying information and communication. In turn, every team member must apprise every other member (as well as the manager) of every development. This is where trust comes into play.

No team can function without honesty, without an understanding of everyone’s strengths and weaknesses. This is not a bad thing. Again, quite the opposite. Honest evaluation doesn’t make one team member “weak” or another “strong.” It makes everyone more effective and valued. It also helps the team to be more organized and efficient.

When a team has the shared vision to be successful, and to sublimate ego to achieve an excellent group outcome, it leads to a sense of mutual support and an amazing flow of fresh ideas. Ideas rarely spring to life from thin air. They build on other ideas. When a team is determined to work together, it is not uncommon for “creatives” to have excellent technical questions or for technical minds to suggest amazing marketing ideas. As a keynote speaker on teamwork, to me, one of the saddest things is when team members admit they were so disappointed in the group that they intentionally withheld ideas.

The shared vision of everyone on the team to be successful and to make a difference is self-fulfilling. When a team is successful on one project, they are highly likely to be successful on another.

Do you have the determination to build great teams in your organization? It may involve getting out of comfort zones, to work together to support rather than divide, and to celebrate honesty and efficiency over ego.

We should all build great teams because they lead to the greatest organizations. At the end of the day, that should be all that matters.

 

Contact Scott Burrows, Inspirational Keynote Speaker on Teamwork today through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

 

“Does Our Industry Need Meetings Anymore?”

 

As a keynote speaker who works extensively with meeting planners and companies in the incentive industry, I know all too well about doom and gloom forecasts when it comes to industry meetings.

These are uncertain times for trade shows and the exhibition industry, and with it, meeting planners and incentive executives are often confused as to how to project into the future.

In March 2017, David McMillin in writing for the Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA) fired a warning shot that too many took to heart without reading the entire article:

“All good things must come to an end. After 25 consecutive quarters of year-over-year growth for the exhibition industry, the economists at the Center for Exhibition Industry Research (CEIR) received the first dose of negative news with a 0.4-percent decline…” However, McMillin continued that there was “plenty of upside depending on how international trade and modernization of the industry would unfold in 2018.” Turns out, he was right.

In March 2019, the CEIR “Total Index” showed a strong 2018 rebound:

“The growth of the [meetings] industry, as measured by the CEIR Total Index, accelerated from a year-over-year gain of 0.9 percent in the third quarter to 2.5 percent in the fourth quarter.”

CEIR Economist Dr. Allen Shaw, stated: “The performance during the fourth quarter shows the resilience of the exhibition industry despite uncertainties surrounding the trade negotiation with China, volatile stock markets and slowing world economic growth.”

Shaw pointed out that while there have been huge gains in the Food, Government, and Raw Materials and Science sectors, on the other hand Consumer Goods and Retail Trade, Financial, Legal, Real Estate, and Transportation have not fared as well.

As an experienced meeting planner, you understand that while the economy may change, to eliminate meetings is the wrong approach to solving an industry’s problems. In fact, the reverse may be true.

Don’t Give in to Negativity

Doomsayers are more than willing to tell meeting planners that the “trade show is dead.” They point to the power of the internet, the new media, meeting software platforms, remote workers and co-working strategies as signaling the end to meetings.

Are these critics handcuffed by a lack of vision and the determination to be successful? I think so and many meeting professionals agree with me.

Mark Goren, an expert on trade show trends, wrote (August 2018): “What will the future of trade shows look like? Think experience meets relationship-building, or essentially, engagement marketing…where consumers are invited and encouraged to participate and actively engage with a brand through an experience. When it’s cleverly employed at trade shows, engagement marketing creates powerful, one-on-one connections…”

Maura Keller, writing for Association Conventions & Facilities said, “Creating a connection with the audience is paramount, and incorporating interactive elements within trade show design is key. Not surprising, interactivity within an exhibit booth is important to create a face-to-face connection and memorable experience for show attendees.”

Despite the doubters, in this digitized era meeting attendees crave real connection and relationships. The technology may be shifting but the need to engage with your audience, whether one-on-one, or one-to-one-thousand, has never been greater.

Negativity is crippling, but the determination and vision to overcome adversity will yield unbelievable results.

Book Scott Burrows, Keynote Speaker for the Meeting Planning and Incentive Industries, through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

Comfortable Sales Goals Lead to Sleeping at Your Desk

 

Not long ago, I was leading a seminar on real estate sales and setting sales goals when a new agent asked if I thought daily prospecting and follow-up did much good. She clarified she prospected when she had a chance, but she was more interested collecting referrals. She shrugged when I questioned how she defined goals for collecting referrals. Then I asked if she felt she had the grit be successful. The word “grit” stopped her cold.

What are Your Goals for Real Estate Sales Success?

Depending on the source, the failure rate for real estate agents after one year has been estimated at between 75 and 87 percent. Most of the agents who do make it barely squeak by. The old rule of thumb said that about 80 percent of the brokers make 20 percent of the profits. The new norm is even more intimidating. According to industry experts, it has now become the 90/10 Rule where 90 percent of the realtors earn 10 percent of the commissions and ultimately, just the top 1 percent of the realtors earn 40 percent of the commissions!

Mike Lalji, a highly successful real estate broker for the past 35 years, described some key elements that characterize a “1 percenter.”

“Those 1% Realtors…pretty much make whatever their written goal is for the new year. They write their goals a day or 2 before the 1st of January of the new year… they develop good interpersonal relationships with family and friends and are self-motivated.”

The Close.com website in a January 2019 article entitled “Why So Many Realtors Fail After 2 Years (and How Not To)” listed a failure to set goals as one of the key reasons new real estate agents fail to make the cut.

The article cited a sophisticated scientific paper printed in 2015 in Nature magazine. Simply put, the article stated that written goal setting and the determination to follow it through erases all differences between gender, ethnicity, race and other factors.  No matter where new agents start out, if they write down their goals and have the grit to follow it through, they have an infinitely better chance of succeeding.

The Joy of Prospecting

Alexis Petersen writing in January 2019 for RIS Media, an online real estate magazine, stated several goals in order for agents to be successful and listed the following as being important:  setting realistic prospecting goals, committing to prospecting ideas – including cold calls and visits as well as referrals, focusing on quantity prospecting (not just to friends and family), following up on every call, email, text or inquiry, and my favorite, “Make prospecting part of your daily routine.”

Petersen echoed other articles written by industry professionals. It is having the determination to write down and set goals, the grit to prospect every day, to follow up on every lead, and to network whenever possible. As a real estate sales professional, you must have the vision to separate yourself from the pack and be part of the 1 percent who believe they will succeed.

Don’t get comfortable and wait for the market to come to your feet. It won’t. Have the courage to stand up and be a professional real estate agent, fighting each day for your success.

Book Scott Burrows, Inspirational Real Estate Keynote Speaker on Sales and Goal Setting, through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

Anyone Can Manipulate, Top Sales Producers Sell

 

In delivering keynote presentations on sales and in helping average salespeople develop their full potential to become top sales producers, I call upon my experience and passion. When I was in the insurance and financial services industry, I was determined to have the single-minded vision to go from a being a novice sales professional to a member of the Million Dollar Round Table. What’s more, I did it within five years.

Despite my top-producing sales success, I wanted more. I wanted to speak, motivate and mentor others. If I could have the determination to rise from my chair and achieve victory over my obstacles, so can you.

Stop Wasting Your Time

Permit me for being blunt, but if you want to be a top producing salesperson, stop wasting your time. Not all that long ago, they were preaching that in order to successfully sell, you had to earn the trust and respect of every prospect. While I would never think of being rude or disrespectful, I agree with what Jacque Werth said in his article, High Probability Selling:

“Most salespeople believe that their primary function is to persuade prospects to buy their products and services.  Therefore, they utilize manipulative persuasion tactics, which most prospects resent.”

Manipulation creates sales resistance and results in low closing rates. Prospects may chomp the doughnuts you bring, but they won’t buy. I’d go further and suggest that many salespeople waste their time on people who have no intention of buying at all.

In fact, I would go even further and suggest that many salespeople fail to correctly prospect or to cultivate the customers who will potentially buy from them. This often leads to disappointment where a salesperson might say, “I thought we were friends, and in the end, I was told they couldn’t buy from me. It was a waste of time.” Don’t blame the prospect in such cases, turn the spotlight on yourself.

You are Plenty Good Enough

It is not a matter of dressing for success or copying someone else’s style. Be yourself but understand self-discipline. Every top producer knows that there is absolutely nothing easy about sales which is why manipulation never works. It takes grit to develop the focus to get to the right prospects every day and to power through leads, calls and meetings. It is not a matter of developing a friendship with a prospect, though it sometimes happens, but learning your product, putting in the work, and being confident enough to start closing the sale the minute you walk through the door.

When I was in a hospital bed battling with quadriplegia, my toughest customer was myself. I had to convince myself that I had the ability to overcome the adversity that was in front of me, then I had to convince the medical team of what I could do to exceed their expectations.

Barry Farber, in his article for Inc. magazine entitled, 7 Reasons Sales Pros Fail, noted that salespeople who fail are typically unorganized, have negative attitudes and poor work ethics, and my “favorite,” don’t believe in themselves.

Salespeople who manipulate rather than sell, who are unorganized in how they seek out prospects, who develop a negative attitude during times when sales aren’t easy and who shy away from putting in the daily grind of selling, will fail. Don’t be one of them. Have the grit and determination to see the success of your efforts.

 

Contact Scott Burrows today, top-rated inspirational Keynote Speaker for Top Sales Producers, through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

When Being “Only Human” Can Lead to Catastrophe

As a national keynote speaker on workplace safety and accidents caused by stress and other factors, I am familiar with the worn excuse of “they were only being human.” I remember the accident that led to my becoming a quadriplegic.

Family and friends told me that my failure to wear a seatbelt was because I was only human and under stress. In the months after the crash, I wondered what might have happened had I the vision to see where my choices could lead and the determination to overcome my carelessness in the first place.

Human Factors

The American Institute of Stress (March 28, 2019) stated that “80% of workers feel stress on the job, nearly half say they need help in learning how to manage stress.” In the same report it was noted that of all of the factors in the workplace that cause stress, the largest reason at 46 percent was workload. When a heavy workload is combined with stress, accidents occur. Those under stress usually think they can do more than they can safely do. They are too rushed and too stressed to ask for help.

The “Institute” reflected the ideas of Dr. David Spiegel, medical director of the Stanford Center on Stress and Health in Stanford, California in Safety + Health magazine:

“Safety professionals can play an important role in helping workers cope with stress.

It’s very clear that a big proportion of safety problems are due to human error, and some of that is related to stress. You need to be concerned as a manager for the overall health of your employees.”

Safety Consultant Dr. Michael Topf has spent a career working to help reduce employee stress. His observation about workers and the effects of workplace pressure have shattered a lot of myths. No matter the educational level, from Ph.D.’s on down, when stress is in play problems arise. You can’t overcome poor safety habits with intellectual thought:

“What I found was that…stress has an impact on safety. People learn to stuff their feelings. They hide their stress. They think, ‘You need to be bigger than it.’ So, it all goes in, but it doesn’t go away – it’s all stored in your body somewhere. It’s stored mentally and it’s stored physically.”

Topf gave a hypothetical example of a worker who had a sick parent in the hospital.

“You get to work and you’re climbing a ladder or you’re on scaffolding. While you’re walking along on the scaffolding, part of your attention is on where you’re walking and what you’re doing, but also part of your attention is on your sick mother in the hospital. Loss of focus or inattention is a major cause of injury.”

Overcoming Poor Decisions

As a safety professional, you must have the insight and the determination to see the connection between stress, workload and workplace accidents. Safety is a company-wide challenge. Safety professionals need the resolve to help workers under stress.

Finally, of the 46 percent of workers in the AIS study who cited workload as a major problem for causing stress (and accidents), in turn most of them saw stress as affecting their co-workers as well. Safety is everyone’s business. “Being human” is an explanation and an excuse we must avoid.

 

Contact Scott Burrows, National Keynote Speaker on Safety and Stress Related Workplace Accidents, through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

My Longest Race was One-Eighth of an Inch

As an overcoming adversity keynote speaker, I am frequently asked who the main influence was in helping me to overcome a major cervical spine injury that determined I would be a quadriplegic. My father lent me the wisdom to deal with adversity.

What do you visualize?

When my father taught me to play golf his first lesson was that I master the art of visualization.

“Scott, be willing to see complete success in your mind’s eye first. Now imprint that outcome over and over. Do it so frequently that your mind can no longer tell the difference between what you are fighting for and what is real.”

I thought of that advice as I awakened after an accident paralyzed me from the chest down. Through the weeks of constant therapy, I had only one focus: to move something. I knew if I could move a finger, just the joint of a finger, then I could accomplish anything. After a rigorous therapy session, I again focused on moving my hand. It worked! I moved my wrist one-eighth of an inch. It was like being the first-place finisher at the Boston Marathon.

The road toward recovery was tough, I won’t kid you, but with determination I went further than anyone around me imagined. This brings to mind a quote by author Robert Heinlein, “Always listen to experts. They’ll tell you what can’t be done, and why. Then do it.”

Most people give up before they allow themselves to succeed. This is especially true with sales professionals who shy away from adversity rather than overcoming it.

How determined are you?

Deep Patel writing for Entrepreneur magazine, “10 Ways Successful People Push Through Adversity,” reflected “How is it that some [sales] people can bounce back and find a way to overcome misfortune and defeat? They don’t allow themselves to become overwhelmed with negative emotions or thoughts. They take time to process what they’ve been through, then they resume moving forward. Their mental fortitude lifts them up to seek opportunities instead of dwelling in despair.”

When I was in the hospital, I could have easily given in to negativity but I developed the grit to find optimism in every sign I encountered.

The Harvard Business Review recently found that the annual turnover in some professional sales organizations had climbed to as high as 27 percent. The publication found that contrary to popular opinion, it wasn’t the poorest salespeople who quit, but those who were average. They lacked the ability to visualize themselves as taking it to the next level so they walked away.

Business News Daily in an article about the traits of successful salespeople said, “Top sales people while grounded in reality, focus on what they can control, stay on course with optimism about what they can achieve, and [don’t] let the rest drag them down.”

Once I knew I could move my wrist, I understood that with determination my arms and fingers and even legs could follow. I did not allow those around me to convince me to accept “just” one-eighth inch of movement as the best I’d ever achieve, nor did I ever minimize the accomplishment.

You can visualize yourself as “average,” and settle for that, or to overcome adversity to be greater than you ever imagined.

 

Contact Scott Burrows, Motivational Speaker on Overcoming Adversity in Sales through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

 

 

 

What Does It Mean to Be a Resilient Sales Team?

          When I speak to sales teams about resiliency, it’s not difficult to feel passionate about it. As the result of an accident that landed me in a wheelchair and quickly ended a successful sports career, I had to develop the mindset to climb back into the ring of life. I was forced to push through painful and often overwhelming physical circumstances with focus and resiliency, while at the same time reinvent my life and adjust my mindset to a new career in sales as an insurance and financial advisor.

You are more than words

Dr. Alia J. Crum is one of the world’s leading authorities on stress. In 2013, she co-wrote a brilliant article entitled “Rethinking Stress: The Role of Mindsets in Determining the Stress Response.” Her article focused on stress and negativity. To quote from her findings:

“Stress is [often] portrayed in a negative light…the intention of these depictions is to help prevent or stem the negative effects of stress: however, if the self-fulfilling nature of mindset exists, the result of such prophesy may be counter effective. Repetitive portrayals of stress in a negative light not increases the possibility that we form the mindset that stress-is-debilitating…”

This finding is important for sales teams who are facing challenges. What Dr. Crum is saying is that if a sales team wills itself to say, “We’re under so much stress to produce, we don’t know what to do. We might as well give up.” The team will come to believe that it can’t overcome the adversity it is facing; the team will lose its resiliency to find new solutions. It will, in fact, will itself to become crippled.

The American Psychological Association in its paper, “The Road to Resilience” gives 11 keys to overcoming major challenges. Among the more important keys to avoid seeing a crisis as an insurmountable problem is to develop resiliency, to accept that change is a part of living, to always be moving toward goals, and to not be afraid to take decisive action.

Your sales team may be confronted with major competitors, a shift in the economy, new technologies or even a shakeup in your organization. It doesn’t mean there aren’t solutions.

Resiliency is about finding a new way to take action. Your vision and mindset, combined with the determination to overcome the adversity of what is in front of the team will make you successful.

The sales professional website, Salesforce.com, sees resilience as the way to overcome negative messages. In order to overcome adversity, they advise that sales teams should build trust, build accountability, build commitment, and that you should build your team and most importantly work on building yourself.

I rose out of my bed because I trusted those around me, I made myself accountable for what I could do, I made a commitment to myself and to my therapists, I resolved to be a strong member of my sales team and I never let my mindset settle for anything less than my best. Sales people and sales teams can become more resilient.

Is your sales team ready to accept the task of becoming more resilient to the challenges you are facing? The best sales teams are the most resilient. Taking the first step may not be easy, but taking the first step never fails to lead to the next.

 

Contact Scott Burrows, World-Class Inspirational Speaker on Creating Resilient Sales Teams through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

 

As a motivational education speaker, I know how hard it is to change the mindset of defeat and overcome adversity. I was once a Division 1 athlete and a competitive martial artist. I thought I was indestructible. Then I was involved in an automobile accident that left me a quadriplegic. From my hospital bed I had an important choice to make: to get up and go on with my life, or give in to defeat. There were those who tried to convince me that my condition would be as good as it could ever get, and that it would be understandable if I walked away from my purpose and myself. I refused to accept the pronouncement and from that bed I developed the philosophy that propelled me to succeed.

Educators are facing many crippling challenges as well and many find it is easier to give up than go on. According to the Washington Post in an article entitled “Where have all the teachers gone?” it was reported that “teacher education enrollment dropped from 691,000 to 451,000, a 35 percent reduction, between 2009 and 2014 — and nearly 8 percent of the teaching workforce is leaving every year, the majority before retirement age.”

Why are so many educators giving up?

It was the great statesman Benjamin Disraeli who said, “There is no education like adversity,” to which I might add, there is no adversity quite like being an educator. Do you have the mindset to overcome the adversity of being an educator in today’s environment? I know you do.

The Challenges are Many

The website Classcraft.com listed eight challenges that teachers face. The challenges are often too much for some educators to bear. Teachers must perform many roles these days; they are often held accountable for more than they should; they face mountains of excessive paperwork; and they have trouble keeping up with the expectations of school administrators. The challenges don’t end there.

In August 2018, the National Education Association (NEA) ran an article entitled “10 Challenges Facing Public Education Today.” At the top of the list were a lack of funding, school safety concerns (since Columbine, almost 200,000 students have been exposed to gun violence), and stress as nearly 93 percent of elementary school teachers alone report stress as affecting their health and welfare.

Educators are also seeing widening gaps between policy and implementation, complex problems with applying one curriculum to students with different learning rates, and the influx of non-native speaking English students into school systems. No wonder the stress is overwhelming.

From my conversations with educators across the country, I know that teachers who used to love to inspire students complain of “no longer having fun in the classroom,” They feel emotionally drained, lacking even the ability to even attend to “personal needs” during the day.

Reconnecting with Your Vision

Are you determined to overcome the adversity you face as an educator and to re-kindle your vision and re-ignite your passion? Or will you be a statistic? Will you be another ex-educator who quit a profession they loved because they lost the determination to continue?

In virtually every market research study, teachers cited these top reasons for why they first entered the profession: they wanted to make a difference, they wanted to influence the personal development of children, they wanted to have a positive impact on the world. While many public forums exist where teachers and administrators gloat over leaving the profession, many more regret their decision.

How can you overcome the stress and the disappointment of adversity and come back stronger and more motivated than ever? You can do it by revisiting the same compelling VISION that first brought you in as an educator and focusing on the things you can control in the workplace and classrooms. Furthermore, you can summon the courage and grit needed to make changes to the system so that teaching becomes fun again by developing an unstoppable mindset and recognizing the kind of value you bring each and every day to your students and coworkers. Remember: the influence you have on one life will impact many others. Don’t give up too soon!

 

Contact Scott Burrows, Inspirational Education Motivational Speaker through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169

The Toll of the Takeover: Change Your Mindset

 

In delivering my motivational addresses on Change Management, I am often asked about the toll that mergers and takeovers have on the employees of the organization.

I view mergers and takeovers as paralleling the experiences I encountered after my two accidents. I went from being a competitive martial artist and Division I football player to a quadriplegic; from physically in-control of myself to fighting for my life in a hospital bed. During my extensive rehab, I had to find a new mindset. It led me to inspiring employees undergoing change in their organizations to overcoming the hardship they face in losing the familiar and the predictable.

The Fear is Real

In his 1987 book, The Employee Guide to Mergers and Acquisitions, Dr. Price Pritchett identified the fears of employees when they realize their companies are about to undergo takeovers. The fears include: uncertainty, ambiguity, mistrust, and self-preservation. During the takeover period employees are on-edge; they tend to not believe anything related to them by managements; and many keep low profiles, preferring to stay hidden and stay behind the scenes. I realized these behaviors were very similar to the patient who blames the world for their troubles, does not follow doctor’s orders for strength and conditioning, and essentially gives up.

There are much better ways to change the negative mindset when a merger or takeover is about to unfold. In January 2019, The Journal of Urgent Care Medicine presented a paper entitled, “Dealing with the Emotional Impact of a Merger or Acquisition.” Not surprising, three emotions set in throughout the organization: shock and numbness, suffering (as the full impact sets in), and what is called “resolution,” or as I like to call it, the “what are you going to do about it?” stage. After my initial diagnosis, I was first in shock, then I realized what the outcome could be and finally, what could I do to change my mindset?

While the fear is real, the ultimate outcome is up to every employee of the organization to either see themselves as “sick” or to overcome the adversity of change and accept that the best change agent is you. In accepting the fact that the takeover or merger is happening, there is the choice to blame anyone and everything on the takeover or to accept the situation and handle it as you would any growth experience.

It Comes Down to Positive Mindset

The organization Total Wellness Health outlined mindset-changing attitudes whether your organization is undergoing a takeover or merger or other sweeping changes. Among the most important coping skills to help employees manage change are using positive messaging – be optimistic about the future; develop positive relationships, especially with your new co-workers; be upbeat, even if others wallow in negativity; and always communicate with others in a positive way.

In managing change we each have a choice. Many years ago, while lying in a hospital bed, I was determined to have an optimistic vision of wellness and I worked hard toward that goal. A positive mindset is contagious and affects everyone around you. The best way to manage change is to be a positive change agent.

Contact Scott Burrows, Change Management Mergers/Takeover Motivational Speaker, through this website or call us at: (520) 548-1169